Matilda's Story

Matilda lives with her loving servants who include The Bearded Man, The Lady, and Dog.

She was born on Valentine's Day in 2013 in a hoarder house in a small town, and was quickly picked up by a rescue society. When she found her forever home she was only 12 weeks old and the cutest, teensiest thing that anyone had ever seen! She came home from the vet that day with a cone on her head and showed no fear when she met Dog who was about 10 times her size. In fact, she sat on the couch with her new people like she already owned the place while Dog whined on the floor. She has always been a boss.

As she grew older and bigger everything seemed normal, except for her having one squinty eye from time to time which earned her the nickname of Quasimodo, which stuck for a while. Shortly after her first birthday, her right pupil became enlarged and stayed that way for several minutes. The Lady rushed her to the vet and, of course, by the time they arrived everything had gone back to normal and the vet was certain that The Lady was crazy for bringing a perfectly healthy cat to her in such a panic.

Everything was normal for a few days and then it happened again, and back to the vet everyone went. Again - everything returned to normal in the moments it took to get to the vet. At a loss, the vet suggested we see the veterinary ophthalmologist if we insisted that something was amiss with Matilda's eyes.

The servants sought a second opinion after that, and drove two towns over to see a trusted vet that had helped Dog many times in the past. She too was stumped, and tested Matilda for everything under the sun. Her tests came back positive for feline leukaemia.

Matilda's servants were sad, but there were certainly worse things that could happen to a beautiful little kitten. With care, she would lead a happy and healthy life, they thought. What was more confusing was that it didn't make sense. Matilda had tested negative for feline leukaemia when she was adopted, and as an indoor cat, hadn't had any contact with other cats since then, and so it would have been very difficult to pick up such a disease.

Searching for answers, The Lady contacted the rescue society that Matilda came from to try and solve the mystery. Also, it was important that the people that took Matilda's siblings home could also have sick kittens, and they ought to know if they did. When she heard back from the rescue society there was a surprise - they had moved offices and had lost the contact information for Matilda's servants, and had been trying to reach them for months! As it turned out, two of Matilda's littermates had developed a mysterious eye condition, and they had been trying to re-find Matilda.

The Lady contacted the people with the other cats right away to gain more information about the eye problem and then took Matilda back to the vet, where she was tested again for feline leukaemia. This test came back negative (phew!), and an appointment with the veterinary ophthalmologist was set up right away. This specialist came with her many sophisticated instruments and tests, and confirmed that Matilda displayed signs of spontaneous lens luxation, just like her siblings.

So now came the question of what to do. Unfortunately, there was no simple answer. The lenses in her right eye had spontaneously detached, and nobody really knew what would happen next. One of Matilda's sisters had undergone a surgery to remove the lenses completely with mixed results. Part of their genetic disorder includes a collagen deficiency, which makes it very difficult to heal from injuries and surgery. After much discussion and consideration, The Lady and The Bearded Man decided with the veterinary ophthamologist's support that we would let Matilda's eyes do what they naturally would, and would not intervene with a traumatic surgery that did not appear to be helpful. Their minds were made up even more when they learned that if given the choice again, Matilda's sister's servant would not opt for the surgery. As long as Matilda remained happy and healthy, that was the only thing that mattered.

Since then, Matilda's eyes have changed and evolved constantly. When the left eye followed the right and the lens luxated, she became withdrawn and sad for a couple of days and her servants were extremely worried. They used the eyedrops that the veterinary ophthalmologist had prescribed to reduce pressure and pain, which Matilda hated, but they kept at it. After two days she came around, and became her regular self again. Those days were the hardest ones! It has been life as usual since then.

Matilda's servants take her to see a vet regularly and to see the ophthalmologist when necessary. She is always up to date on her checkups and shots, and they watch her very closely to notice any changes in behaviour that might suggest that she's uncomfortable. No matter what happens, her servants think she's perfect and beautiful and will love and care for her the absolute best way that they can for however long this little alien is here.